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The call for the II Edition of the Women Agro Awards 2019 is open

Siete Agromarketing, a leading communication and marketing agency in the agri-food sector, and eComercio Agrario, a newspaper of national and international political and economic information, convene the II Edition of the 'WOMEN AGRO Awards' 2019, promoting equal opportunities in the value chain and agrifood industry.

The MAPAMA will publish in April a Manual of Shared Ownership of Farms

The Ministry of Agriculture and Fisheries, Food and Environment (MAPAMA) plans to publish a Manual of Shared Ownership of Farms in April, as was advanced in the second meeting of the working group on Shared Ownership, held on March 21st. With the participation of representatives of the autonomous communities, in this meeting the works carried out for this purpose were exposed. The guide includes an analysis by autonomous communities, a description of the process of registration in shared ownership and a block of frequently asked questions. It is aimed both at people interested in knowing the requirements necessary to register in a shared ownership, as well as at the managers and administrations involved in the process.

The Andalusian Women Network goes to Expoliva to boost the visibility of its collective in the primary sector

Women's associations and Rural Development Groups in Jaén, Málaga and Córdoba seek to give greater visibility to the role of women in the agro-food and fisheries sector through their participation in the XVIII International Fair of Olive Oil and Related Industries, Expoliva . This is the first time that this type of initiative is launched in a sector as masculinizado as it is still the agrarian.

Spain: Innovative Women Wanted

The Ministry of Agriculture, Food and Environment (MAGRAMA) announces the seventh edition of the Awards of Excellence for Innovation for Rural Women 2016. These awards aim to distinguish original and innovative projects, agricultural and agro-based activities that contribute to the diversification economic activity and promote women entrepreneurship
Paisaje agrícola, cultivos. Imagen: Dave Dyet / FreeImages

Rural women, strategic to manage risk in climate change

Incorporate the gender perspective is strategic in addressing food and nutrition security, climate change and risk management, because it allows us to contemplate differently the needs and interests of women and men, to propose realistic solutions and reduce gaps development and progress towards gender equality and equity. These are the conclusions of a web seminar IICA.

Spain: Cutbacks in the field aggravate female unemployment in agriculture

Since 2011 women have destroyed 42,500 jobs in the field and the percentage of total employment in the sector has fallen 26% to 24%. "Women who live and work in rural areas are the main victims of cuts in services and infrastructure in the villages. Without basic care services, can hardly enhance women's employment in agriculture, "stressed Immaculate Idáñez, head of the Department of Women COAG and President of CERES.

More support to entrepreneurs and shared ownership in rural areas

On the occasion of the celebration of International Women's Day, it commemorated and worldwide, Fademur has claimed the governments more support for entrepreneurs and cooperatives in rural areas, as well as a strong commitment to shared ownership of farms agricultural, "essential to bring to light the work without rights" of village women. "One in five women in Spain is rural, and deserve attention and recognition, also on March 8," they say.

Madrid hosts the largest gathering of rural entrepreneurs women

More than a hundred women entrepreneurs from all over Spain will meet on 24 and 25 at the ninth meeting of rural women cooperatives, organized by Fademur. At the conference workshops and debates on entrepreneurship in rural areas, creation of businesses and jobs in the villages will be made.
Mujeres rurales en Guatemala. Imagen: UN Trust Fund/Phil Borges

The empowerment of rural women through the Sustainable Development Goals

The empowerment of rural women through the Sustainable Development Goals This week, UN Women held three days of the United Nations that reflect the fundamental role of women in development, starting with the International Day of Rural Women on October 15, World Food Day on October 16 and International Day for the Eradication of Poverty on 17 October. These interrelated topics are more relevant than ever this year, when just adopted the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development as a new global roadmap. Gender equality and empowerment and women's rights are crosscutting issues in Agenda 2030, with its 17 Sustainable Development Goals (ODS). The objectives are intrinsically linked to the lives of women and girls around the world, including rural women, who are essential to its success. In particular, they emphasize the goal of eradicating poverty in all its forms and throughout the world, the goal of ending hunger, achieving food security, improving nutrition and sustainable agriculture as well as the goal of achieving gender equality and empower all women and girls. Rural women are key agents for economic, environmental and social changes needed for sustainable development but limited access to credit, health care and education are some of the many challenges they face. These are further compounded by the global crisis and Alimentaria-economic and climate change. Ensure their empowerment is not only essential for the well-being of individuals, families and rural communities, but also to the general economic productivity, given the strong presence of women in the world's agricultural work. In figures Rural women spend more time than men and urban women to housework and chores. A study on the time and the water poverty in 25 countries in sub-Saharan Africa, it is estimated that women spend at least 16 billion hours collecting water daily; men spend 6 million hours in this activity; and girls and boys, 4 million hours. The farmers control less land than men and have limited access to inputs, seeds, credit and extension services. Less than 20 percent of landowners are women. Gender differences in access to land and credit influence the relative ability of farmers and farmers and entrepreneurs to invest, operate to scale and take advantage of new economic opportunities. Maternal deaths disproportionately affect rural women so. In less developed countries, rural women have a 38 percent less likely compared to urban women giving birth with the assistance of a professional or competent health [3]. Data from a forthcoming study by UN Women, the World Bank and the Initiative on Poverty and Environment indicate that the gender gap in agricultural productivity between 4 percent and 40 percent depending on the country and food or cash crop in question, and could cost up to $ 100 million in Malawi, 65 million USD in Uganda, and 106 million USD in the United Republic of Tanzania. Our job UN Women supports the leadership and participation of rural women in the design of laws, strategies, policies and programs in all matters affecting their lives, including improved food and nutritional security, and improved rural livelihoods. The training equips these women with skills that allow them access to new livelihoods and adapt technology to their needs. UN Women works to end poverty through programs that provide training, loans and practical skills to empower poor rural women, giving them the opportunity to express themselves, strengthening social services and raise awareness regarding the rights of women. The organization works to ensure women's access to basic services, control over land and other forms of property, inheritance, natural resources and appropriate new technology and financial services. This week, UN Women held three days of the United Nations that reflect the fundamental role of women in development, starting with the International Day of Rural Women on October 15, World Food Day on October 16 and International Day for the Eradication of Poverty on 17 October.
Paisaje agrícola, cultivos. Imagen: Dave Dyet / FreeImages

Day of Rural Women: agronomic engineers

Day of Rural Women: agronomic engineers The rural world has always seen as a man's world, the world of farmers and engineers; but the fact is that women are engaged in agricultural activity in Spain represent a collective of six million people, ie 48.9% of the population in rural areas and a third of the female Spanish society. Speaking of engineers, we have to say that the gap between engineers and engineers for some time is not as great. Indeed, we could say that is exceeded. This evolution is also reflected in the registrations of agricultural engineering schools. In the School of Agricultural Engineers of the Polytechnic University of Madrid, during 2015-2016, they have enrolled a total of 1,279 students in degree, of which 683, 53% are women. "Years ago they were surprised when they saw you coming, now see it as something normal." Araceli Santiago is Engineer Agronomist, expert appraiser, collaborator Agroseguro as free professional. For years he has devoted to the valuation of holdings, a job that has kept him very close to the rural world. "In recent years there has been an evolution, slow, but has noticed," he says. Professionally she has never felt discriminated against and describes his work as very rewarding to be in touch with the rural world and its people. Monica Sobrino, Agricultural Engineering, Agricultural entrepreneur, responsible for the management of agricultural and livestock, also recalls that initially farmers showed little cautious, but after years of work, to prove themselves and their skills, has earned the confidence of all. "It's not about discrimination, rather it is a matter of perception, thinking". For this agricultural engineer by vocation, reconciling work and family life it is sometimes tricky, travel, hours to be devoted, etc. Undoubtedly, this evolution that began years ago must continue, so that the work of women in rural areas and other activities linked to it to be recognized, ensuring gender equality and eliminating discrimination that may exist. Therefore, the Association of Agronomists of Centre and the Canary Islands, which also was the first of all the schools of agronomists who had a Dean, joins the celebration of this day. Source: Association of Agronomists of Centre and the Canary Islands The gap between engineers and engineers for some time is not as great. Indeed, we could say that is exceeded. This evolution is also reflected in the registrations of agricultural engineering schools. "Years ago were surprised when they saw you coming, now see it as something normal," says one of them, Araceli Santiago.